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Jordan Spieth On Pace With Jack Nicklaus, Ahead of Tiger Woods

Stop Ignoring Jordan Spieth’s Greatness

In a way, Tiger Woods ruined golf for some people.

His days of dominance, (steroids), winning and swagger had everyone in awe.

He was a polarizing figure from his Sunday red, his fun little tiger headcover, or his famous reactions to some of the most famous shots in golf history.

It may also help he was a child prodigy that actually panned out.

Either way, before the divorce, DUI and switch to Taylormade, Tiger was everything golf needed.

But that persona and dominance, may be hurting one of the best in the game right now.

Jordan Spieth recently got the third leg of the career grand slam at 23, something only one other golfer has ever done.

Surprisingly, it wasn’t Tiger. It was Jack.

But yet after all his wins, all his majors, all his close calls.

“He is terrible off the tee.”

“He can only putt.”

“He collapses.”

“He will never be Tiger.”

These takes and attitude towards Spieth are ridiculous.

People are trying to compare a 23-year-old kid who may not have even peaked yet to arguably the best to ever do it…

Why?

I have a few theories.

  1. It is almost the Jordan and LeBron argument. I feel that people that watched them at their peaks, have a weird connection and think it is their responsibility to continue their legacy. Not often you meet and older person who watched Jordan in the 90’s say LeBron is better. I think this is the case with Spieth and Tiger. People who watched Tiger come up and dominate people year in and year out, will never admit Spieth is better. Even if he is. For us young golf fans, we need someone to cling on. Spieth’s victory at Chambers Bay brought us in now we love him. But we have old guys telling us to calm down when we see his greatness in front of our eyes because “You were too young to remember Tiger”.
  2. People saw Tiger or heard of how great Tiger was. And that set the bar for them. So as long as people aren’t winning tournaments by double digits, outdriving everyone off the tee and dominating every weekend they wont be great or even close to Tiger. 

If we don’t wake up, we may miss the greatness of one of the best golfers of all time, just because of another golfer.

The Greenbrier Classic Wrap Up

Greenbrier Classic

The Greenbrier Classic is one of the premier tournament stops on the PGA Tour and this week didn’t disappoint.

With big names in the field like Bubba Watson, Phil Mickelson, J.B Holmes and Patrick Reed it was sure to be a firework filled event.

But it wasn’t the big names who made the noise.

Actually it was the little guys you probably have never heard of like Xander Schauffelle, Sebastain Munoz, Jamie Lovemark, Robert Streb and Kelly Kraft who were at the top of the leaderboards.

Munoz put on a show all week leading from Thursday to Sunday morning where he leaned on his putter to get him there.

But when you lean on something and it gets pulled out, you usually stumble and fall.

And that is what happened on Sunday to Munoz.

He carded multiple bogeys that came along with three putts, not ideal when looking for your first PGA Tour victory.

Seeing the collapse, Schauffelle took advantage hitting about 90% of greens in regulation and carding four birdies for a -3, 67 on the day.

Streb and Lovemark couldn’t force a playoff and make things any more interesting as they were near the leader all day but couldn’t get those few important birdies when it mattered.

The real story is the rise of 23-year-old rookie Xander Schauffelle. A few weeks ago he had his best showing at Erin Hills at the U.S. Open when he finished T5, probably a dream come true.

Now just a few weeks later he is raising a trophy above his head.

“Everyone that knows me knows I’m a late bloomer, so to jump in the Top-30 in this fashion is something special for me.” Schauffelle said to the media after his win Saturday.

Emotions were running wild as he talked about his dad, a great moment for golf.

Compress The Ball For Better Iron Shots

compression (2)

Flush It Off The Fairway

Irons are arguably the toughest club to hit in the bag.

They are pretty small, the shafts are longer than a wedge and there isn’t much room for error.

Everyone knows with your driver you want to be on the upswing when you hit the ball, because of the small loft it helps get the ball in the air.

However, a lot of people have no clue where in the swing you should hit irons.

On the way down? Bottom of swing? On the way up?

“Well pros make divots so it must be after they hit the ball, so you hit it at the bottom.”

“Hit it on the way up, get the ball in the air!” Well, that’s wrong. 

Surprisingly, you want to hit the ball on the downswing. You want to compress the ball.

Here is a simple way of explaining it: 

On your downswing, you want to pinch the ball between your club face and the ground, so the ball wont go straight into the ground.

Compression

You want to hit the ball with your right palm facing the ground making the club pound down on the ball.

Once you hit the ball you it will explode off the club face and your club will continue down then up, actually creating the divot after you hit the ball.

Can you believe that? The divot is actually after you hit the ball, not before. Weird.

Once you start hitting your irons on the way down and compressing that little urethane ball with your metal club face, you will be hitting your irons higher and longer than you ever have.

Say goodbye to sweeping the ball off the ground and getting minimal distance and terrible trajectory.

Hit the ball like Dustin Johnson, work on compressing that thing and hit more greens in regulation.

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