Country Club New Bedford

How To Choose The Correct Golf Ball

Many weekend golfers may overlook the importance of the golf balls that they play. You might borrow some from your friends or buy the cheapest balls you can find. However, the ball you play can dramatically affect your scores. The right ball can help you chop strokes off your golf handicap. The wrong ball can cost you strokes and boost scores.

So how to do you choose the correct golf balls?

Ideally, you should choose a ball based on how it boosts your scoring chances. This often comes down to a choice between distance and feel. Do you want a ball that you can hit farther? Or one that helps you putt better?

Below are some common questions we fielded from players in our golf lessons on how to choose a ball. The golf tips below will help you choose one that’s right for you.

1. Should You Use The Same Balls As The Pros? 

No, because the pros have different needs than you. They use specific golf balls that provide them short game spin and control so that they can hit low shots around the green. Weekend golfers need balls that launch and spin more.

One choice for golfers with high golf handicaps is a three-piece ball with a urethane cover. Three-piece balls feature superior driver performance. The urethane cover also provides improved feel and control on approach shots. As you lower your golf handicap, you can start using balls offering better control on shots around the green.

2. What’s the Difference Between Urethane and Surlyn covers?

While both are polymers, they offer different performance characteristics.

Urethane:

  • Urethane offers good green side control, feel, durability, and distance. 
  • It’s more expensive than Surlyn.
  • Players with low golf handicaps should consider using Urethane golf covers

Surlyn:

  • It spins less as you get closer to the green but launches higher off the tee.
  • Works well if you need a short-high approach
  • Ideal for golfers looking for distance and low dispersion off the tee.
  • Players with high golf handicaps should use Surlyn covers.

3. Expensive balls or cheaper balls? Does it matter?

It’s not just about the price of the golf ball you should consider – it also has to do with performance. Premium balls tend to provide better performance than non-premium balls. So if you have a low handicap and you’re serious about improving, it’s worth playing a better ball.

However, if you have trouble hitting the fairway due to distance, try a distance type of ball that spins less. If it comes down to a choice between price and performance, choose performance.

4. When do I need to buy new golf balls?

It depends on how much you use the ball and storage conditions. Store your golf balls at room temperature for maximum life and keep them dry. Storing balls in extremely hot or cold places, like the trunk of your car, limits life. Submerging balls in water for long periods also limits life. Retire any you’ve used excessively. You can start to tell when the golf balls start to wear. 

 

Choosing the right ball can take your game to the next level. It can also help chop strokes off your golf handicap. Take your time choosing a ball. Make it the right one.

CVS Health Charity Classic Donates $1 Million to Southern New England Charities

CVS Charity Classic Gives Back

On December 23 at the corporate headquarters of CVS Health, President and CEO Larry Merlo announced that the CVS Health Charity Classic has reached an important milestone – a total of $20 million dollars in philanthropic support to hundreds of nonprofits in southeastern New England since the tournament’s inception in 1999. This year, the CVS Health Charity Classic donated more than $1 million dollars to nearly 100 area charities.

“The Charity Classic is one of the most important ways we give back in our home state,” said Eileen Howard Boone, Tournament Chairperson of the CVS Health Charity Classic “We are proud and honored to be able to support the invaluable work of these non-profits to support the communities we serve in the areas of education, health care, and social services.”

CVS Charity Classic 2017

CVS Health CEO, Larry Merlo, alongside Tournament Chairperson Eileen Howard Boone, as well as PGA TOUR professionals and CVS Health Charity Classic Co-hosts Brad Faxon and Billy Andrade, awarded the 2017 donations in front of a crowd comprised of CVS Health colleagues, working charity partners that volunteer their time during the event series, many of the awarded non-profits, and Charity Classic sponsors.

Brad Faxon and Billy Andrade, natives from Rhode Island who have been with the event since its inception and the reasons why so many great players have participated in this wonderful local event that has done so much to help local charities both spoke. “I’ve played in many charity tournaments like this, but our little state is kicking butt with how much money we have been able to raise over the years,” said a smiling Faxon.

Billy Andrade said, “I can’t believe how fast the time has gone since our first event in 1999. Seeing how much we have been able to do makes us all so proud.”

The 2017 dates were also announced by Merlo. “We will be hosting the event at Rhode Island Country Club, one of our great partners since the inception, on June 18, 19 and 20.”

In all, 77 local non-profit organizations across Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts will benefit this year from the CVS Health Charity Classic.

Are You Trapped in the Sand?

Do’s and Don’ts in the bunker

Many golfers, whether they are serious players or not, usually know they will receive a a two-stroke penalty for grounding their club in a bunker. But, few know any of the other rules covering bunker play. That’s not surprising. The topic isn’t normally covered even when taking golf lessons. So golfers have to learn them on their own.

The penalty strokes incurred for breaking a bunker rule won’t probably impact golf handicap, but they do have consequences. They can cost you a hole in match play or the match itself. If you play regularly, it’s good to know some of the do’s and don’ts when it comes to bunker play.

  1. Grounding the Club

As mentioned above, this is one of the most common DON’TS when it comes to playing from the sand. You can, however, ground your club in a waste area. Waste areas are usually massive bunker-like regions of firm, unkept sand that aren’t hazards. If you’re not sure where to look courses usually mark these areas for golfers. 

  1. Touching the Sand

Digging in your feet in the sand when hitting from a bunker is okay. You can also leave the bunker, get a new club, come back and dig in your feet again. What you can’t do is touch the sand, meaning, you can’t draw a line in the sand like an instructor might do for a lesson and you also can’t slam your club into the ground because you’re angry you messed up the first shot. I mean, you can do this if you so please, but each infraction will cost you two strokes. 

  1. Raking

This is another area of bunker play not many people know the rules for. You can rake after hitting a bunker shot, even if your ball never left the bunker. However, you can’t disturb your new lie, the area of your stance or swing, or the new line of play for your next shot. You also can’t rake your footprint trail behind you as you walk to your lie. You’d be penalized two strokes for testing the sand’s condition. 

  1. Unplayable Lie

If you have an unplayable lie in a bunker, you may replay your previous shot and take a one-stroke penalty. Or, if you don’t want to go back to your previous shot, take a drop in the bunker within two club lengths of the ball. 

The Next Vokey Wedge is Here

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In the world of golf, there are a lot of factors that come into scoring well and one of the biggest factors are wedges.

Spinning a ball into the green and putting it close to the pin is vital.

One of the best wedges for years on local courses and the PGA Tour has been Titleist’s line of Vokey wedges.

Bob Vokey has long been designing some of the best wedges to hit this earth.

The Vokey line has grown in popularity year in and year out and you see many people still playing the older Vokey’s.

The newest one is almost here. The Vokey SM7 will be getting its first look on course this week at the Shriners Hospital for Children Open at TPC Summerlin.

These are not the finished product. They are rolling out the SM7 prototypes this week and Titleist loyalists Justin Thomas, Jordan Spieth and others will have these wedges in their bags.

“We design the best product possible and take it to the tour. If the tour players accept it, then we say this must be awfully good.”- Bob Vokey.

If you own or have seen last years’ version, the SM6 it was a very sleek looking wedge.

But this year, according to prototype pictures, has a different look, but it may be a little simpler and better looking.

This year’s rendition still has the signature gear in the corner, the BV with the wings and the Titleist logo.

One noticeable difference, that may only be on the prototype is the SM7 logo is just below the BV logo and it makes it look very clean and simple. On the SM6 it was off to the side, tucked in the corner.

Another year, another inevitably great Vokey wedge.

Other companies have tried their hand at wedges, but Vokey remains at the top.

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